Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Wordless Wednesday: Gone to the Dogs #20

Wordless Wednesday is a daily prompt at Geneabloggers that asks family historians to create a post in which the main focus is a photograph or image.

Eliza and James Franklin Jollett  http://jollettetc.blogspot.com
My 2X great-grandfather James Franklin Jollett
his wife Eliza and their dog before 1930

This is probably the oldest dog photo in my collection.

Enough of this.  I’m dog tired.




© 2014, Wendy Mathias.  All rights reserved.

Sunday, November 23, 2014

52 Ancestors: #47 - William JORDAN

Amy Johnson Crow of No Story Too Small has issued a challenge:  write one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor.  It can be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem – anything that focuses on one ancestor.



My 4X great-grandfather William JORDAN was born in 1760 near the Schuylkill River, about six miles from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  When he was 13, his family moved to Augusta County, Virginia.  He moved to nearby Albemarle County about 1783.  He said so himself in his 1832 application for a pension based on his service in the Revolutionary War.

While living in Augusta County, William was drafted into the militia in May 1779.  He served for about three months as a private in Captain William Kincaid’s company.  His first experience in battle was in a campaign against the Indians along the Monongahela River.  By itself, it was a minor skirmish, but it was significant as part of a much larger effort to seize British outposts in what is now the Midwest. 

Map of Battle of Cowpens
from wikimedia commons
From October 1780 to February 1781 he was a private in the company of Captain Patrick Buchanan.  They fought in the Battle of Cowpens, which has been deemed the turning point in the war.  Not only did the colonists finally see the possibility of victory but also the British suddenly felt the possibility of defeat.  William received a written discharge at Guilford Court House in North Carolina, but it was destroyed when his house burned. 

William returned home to Augusta County and married a girl named Mary.  They were just newlyweds when once again he was drafted into the militia.  Beginning May 1781 William served three months as a sergeant with the Commissary Guard in Captain Givens’ company in Colonel Cameron’s regiment.  William was in the Battle of Hotwater and Jamestown, among the last battles prior to the siege of Yorktown.  Coincidentally, my 4X great-grandfather Leonard Davis was also in those battles.  I wonder if they knew one another.

Afterwards, William was transferred into Captain William Findley’s company in Colonel Vance’s regiment.  He was assigned to march with his company to the siege of Yorktown; however, perhaps fortunately, he became sick with ague (a malaria-type illness marked by regular intervals of fever and shivering) and was subsequently furloughed, never to return to service.  By the time he got out of the hospital, the war was over.

The pension application contains no reference to his wife or children.  However, men with whom he served remembered him and vouched for his service.  Local clergy, neighbors, and justice of the peace likewise affirmed his upstanding character.  Apparently William had made several attempts to secure his pension.  In a final plea dated 1833, the justice of the peace said this:

from pension application

He is now very old and exceedingly infirm and poor, he has here said all that he can conscientiously say and hopes that this last appeal to a Country for which he fought will not be disregarded. 




THREE GENERATIONS:
William JORDAN  ( 1761 Philadelphia, PA – After 1850 ) & Mary UNKNOWN

1. Nancy C. JORDAN ( 1806 Albemarle Co, VA – Aug 1860 Rockbridge Co, VA) & William Shelton HARRIS  (10 Jun 1810 Albemarle Co, VA – 25 Apr 1894 Miami Co, OH)  28 Jan 1833 Albemarle Co, VA
  • John E. HARRIS ( 1834 Virginia – ) & Ann E. UNKNOWN ( 1832 – )
  • William Edward HARRIS ( 1836 Virginia – 1875 )
  • James R. HARRIS ( 1840 Virginia – 1865 )
  • Henry C. HARRIS ( 06 Apr 1845 Virginia –  19 Aug 1926 Springfield, Clark, OH )
  • Theophilus Daniel HARRIS ( 1848 Virginia – 1917 Clark, OH )
  • Lucy Ann E. C. HARRIS ( Sep 1852 Virginia – 26 May 1906 Springfield, Clark, OH ) & James Madison BERRY (12 Aug 1846 Page Co, VA – 11 Nov 1919 Springfield, Clark, OH )  26 Jul 1868 Rockingham Co, VA
2. Early B. JORDAN ( 1812 Albemarle Co, VA – ) & Lucy UNKNOWN

3. Susan JORDAN ( 1814 Albemarle Co, VA – 28 Feb 1882 Rockingham Co, VA ) & Isaac SHIPLETT  ( May 1807 Albemarle Co, VA – Jan 1862 Albemarle Co, VA ) 24 Oct 1836 Albemarle, VA
  • Philip Penelton SHIPLETT ( 29 Oct 1837 Albemarle Co, VA – 16 Mar 1919 Rockingham Co, VA ) &  Jennetta Ann DOVEL ( 17 Jan 1841 Rockingham Co, VA  – 24 Mar 1922 Rockingham Co, VA )  13 Dec 1859
  • Octavius SHIPLETT ( 1841 Albemarle Co, VA – 03 Jul 1863 Gettysburg, PA )
  • Lycennius H. SHIPLETT ( 1844 Albemarle Co, VA – 16 Mar 1919 Rockingham Co, VA ) & Emily J. “Ginny” BRUCE  17 Dec 1867 Albemarle, VA
  • Comaia Clarissa SHIPLETT ( 1847 Albemarle, VA –  03 Sep 1894 ) & John Wesley LONG ( 1847 – )  25 Jul 1867  Albemarle, VA
  • Segourney F. SHIFLETT ( 1851 Rockingham Co, VA – 09 Feb 1926 Washington DC ) & George Harvey EPPARD  (Sep 1839 Rockingham Co, VA – 13 Jan 1917 Rockingham Co, VA )  28 May 1870 Rockingham Co, VA
  • M. E. SHIPLETT ( 1854 – )
  • George SHIPLETT ( 1856 – )
4. Clarissa JORDAN ( 21 Feb 1817 Albemarle Co, VA – 07 Jan 1889 Hamilton, Decatur, IO) & John MAY (1808 Virginia – 08 Sep 1873 Decatur, IO )  07 Apr 1836 Albemarle Co, VA
  • Ann MAY ( 1836 Virginia – )
  • George MAY   ( 1838 Virginia – )      
  • John MAY  ( 1841 Virginia – )          
  • James MAY  ( 1843 Virginia – )               
  • Mary MAY  ( 1846 Indiana – )                   
  • Newton MAY  ( 1848 Indiana – )                                       
  • Alfred B. MAY  ( 1850 Indiana – )                                           
  • Lucy M. MAY   ( 1852 Indiana – )
  • Sarah MAY ( 1856 Decatur, IO – )

Source:
Pension Application of William Jordan (Age 72), 2 October 1832; for service of William Jordan (Pvt., Cpt. Kincaid and Cpt. Buchanan; Sgt., Cpt. Givens, Revolutionary War); Case Files of Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Applications Based on Revolutionary War Service, compiled ca. 1800-ca 1912, documenting the period ca. 1775 - ca. 1900; Department of Veterans Affairs, Record Group 15; National Archives, Washington, D.C.; digital images, "Revolutionary War Pensions," Fold3.com (www.fold3.com : accessed 16 November 2014); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm publication M804.


 © 2014, Wendy Mathias.  All rights reserved.

Friday, November 21, 2014

Sepia Saturday: The Kitchen Set

Sepia Saturday challenges bloggers to share family history through old photographs.



This week’s Sepia Saturday prompt shows a family with mother surrounded by her three children and their toys.  Now there’s a familiar sight!  While there is no tree in the photo, the scene reminds me of Christmas morning. 

Wendy and Mary Jollette 1964  http://jollettetc.blogspot.com
Christmas 1964
You wash; I'll dry.
(And that's how it is, even today!)


I grew up when imaginative play for girls included a baby doll and carriage, tea sets, a pink metal ironing board, and a kitchen set.  When Santa brought my sister a kitchen set in 1964, I joined right in pretending to wash little plastic dishes and put away boxes of play food, despite the difference in our age.  After all, it was my duty to instruct my little sister on the proper way to do those things.


So when my girls came along, I looked forward to the day they could have a kitchen set.  Of course, like most great toys, “some assembly is required.”  On Christmas Eve, two geniuses decided to wait for the girls to go to bed before breaking open the box.


Barry and Cam Christmas Eve 1984 http://jollettetc.blogspot.com
Santa's Helpers 2:00 AM
Barry and Cam 1984
Barry and Cam, my sister’s husband, sat on the floor drinking beer, reading directions, drinking beer, looking for parts, drinking beer, assembling and unassembling and reassembling into the wee hours.  Who would have thought it would take so long?  When they were finished, they still had a bag of nuts and bolts and screws left over.


Nevertheless, the kitchen set held up well for many years.  The last time I saw it, this red gingham-check kitchen was a key component in imaginative play at a preschool.

Kitchen Set 1984  http://jollettetc.blogspot.com
Kitchen Set 1984  http://jollettetc.blogspot.com












Kitchen Set 1984  http://jollettetc.blogspot.com










Visit Sepia Saturday to see what others have assembled.



© 2014, Wendy Mathias.  All rights reserved.

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Wordless Wednesday: Gone to the Dogs #19

Wordless Wednesday is a daily prompt at Geneabloggers that asks family historians to create a post in which the main focus is a photograph or image.


Wendy and Bobbie 1960 http://jollettetc.blogspot.com
My cousin Bobbie and me and one of her dogs
either Punky or Chunky - I can never remember
1960 Shenandoah, Virginia

Counting down the number of photos of dogs in my collection



© 2014, Wendy Mathias.  All rights reserved.

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

FGS Ambassador: Plan Ahead for FGS 2015

4 full days.  11 hours a day.  23 Tracks.  43 speakers.  97 sessions plus another 6 for an additional cost during lunch.  Then add an Exhibit Hall with wall to wall vendors showcasing their genealogy goodies.  On top of that, just steps away is the Family History Library with the largest collection of genealogy resources in the world.  How does someone attending the combined conference of Federation of Genealogical Societies and Roots Tech in February do it all?

Easy Answer:  Don’t even try. 

When I attended the National Genealogical Society Conference in Richmond this past May, I sat in on a session every single hour my first day.  The second day, I was already dragging.  The result?  I skipped out on sessions that could have been very worthwhile opting instead for an icy diet Pepsi and a stroll through the Exhibit Hall.  I vowed that I would be better prepared to be a GOOD conference attendee the next time.

PLANNING MY TIME
I think that attending 1 or 2 sessions in the morning and 1 or 2 in the afternoon would be plenty for a day.  The rest of the day I would check out the Exhibit Hall more slowly and thoughtfully than I did in Richmond.  I’d actually stop and look at the books instead of thinking, “Oh ok more books.  Yeah. Yeah.  I wonder what’s over there on the other side.” 

I’d also set aside a day to visit the Family History Library.  Whether I should devote a full day or just half day, I don’t know. 

PLANNING MY SESSIONS
In deciding which sessions to attend, my gut feeling is to say, “Focus on a particular track” and attend just those.  That would be fairly easy for me to do with the upcoming FGS Conference because there are some tracks that don’t pertain to my research, such as Missionaries & Settlers and Ethnic Groups in the West.  I’m not a society leader, so I could easily eliminate The 21st Century Geneological Society, Recruiting & Engaging, Society Leaders & Visionaries, and Benefits & Projects. 

Since I am weak in technology, I would use this conference to focus on sessions in the Technology track as well as those under Modern Access to Vintage Resources.  As confused as I am about DNA, I’d want to be sure to schedule that as well.

MY IDEAL SCHEDULE
Wednesday:  This is Society Day, so most of the sessions hold little interest for me.  This would be a good day for the Family History Library and a lot of browsing in the Exhibit Hall.  But since Lisa Louise Cooke has a class at 10:45 called “How the Genealogist Can Remember Everything with Evernote,” I could shop in the Exhibit Hall in the morning, take this class, and then head to the library in the afternoon.

Thursday
11:00 – “Researching Your War of 1812 Ancestor” presented by Craig Scott.  He’s a dynamic presenter, very funny too.  His presentation in Richmond on the Militia made me a fan, and I’ve done a lot of research on my Revolutionary War ancestors since then.
1:30 –  “Bridging the Gap: Tracing US Ancestors Between 1780 and 1840” presented by Joshua Taylor.  He’s a mover and shaker in the genealogy world, so this is a MUST ATTEND for me.  
3:00 –  Possibly I’d attend “Documenting Your Family Heirlooms” presented by Jennifer Alford.  I THINK I know how, but I’m interested in what methods I might have overlooked.
4:30 – “After You’re Gone: Future Proofing Your Genealogy Research” presented by Thomas MacEntee.  It’s THOMAS.  Of course, I would attend this one and sit up front.  It’s THOMAS, after all.  Helloooo.

Friday:
10:30 – “Gentleman Judges: Justices of the Peace.”  Two good reasons to attend this session are that I have several JPs in my family tree AND it’s presented by Judy Russell.  You know her – the Legal Genealogist.   ‘nuff said
4:00 – “Love and Loss in the Family Album: A Recipe for Finding the Truth” presented by Maureen Taylor. It’s the Photo Detective!  She will be presenting a case study, which teaches by example.  I really like that approach.

Saturday:
This is a big technology day, so now it’s more difficult to decide.
10:30 – Mark Lowe will present “Comparing Records With Vintage Tools and High Tech Resources.”
1:00 –  CeCe Moore is the expert on how DNA and genealogy work together, so her presentation would be a MUST for me:  “The Power of DNA: Introduction to Genetic Genealogy.”
2:30 – One of the FGS and Roots Tech combined sessions “Nifty & Powerful Technologies for Genealogical Analysis & Documentation” might be too techy and too tricky for me, but I do want to know what possibilities exist to enhance my research.
4:00 – Another FGS/Roots Tech presentation concerns the latest happenings at Family Tree DNA:  “5 Fun New Ways to Improve Your Genealogical Research.”  Since I’m participating in a couple of DNA tests through FTDNA, I’d like to learn more.

If you’re even thinking about going to the conference in February, study the program schedule available on the FGS website.  A conference this big can be overwhelming.  It’s smart to plan, but be warned:  a dynamic speaker, a conversation with a vendor, or a meet-up with another blogger or distant cousin can take you in a different direction.  Of course, that could be a good thing too.



© 2014, Wendy Mathias.  All rights reserved.

Sunday, November 16, 2014

52 Ancestors: #46 - Joshua SHIFLETT

Amy Johnson Crow of No Story Too Small has issued a challenge:  write one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor.  It can be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem – anything that focuses on one ancestor.



For a long time I just assumed that my 4X great-grandfather Joshua SHIFLETT was the brother of another of my 4X great-grandfathers, Jacob SHIFLETT.  After all, they were contemporaries; they lived near one another; they appeared together as witnesses in a number of legal documents.  But another descendant of Joshua has presented a stronger argument that Joshua was the son of Thomas, thus making him the brother of Jacob’s father John, and therefore Jacob’s uncle. 

So I’m going with that unless I can prove otherwise.

Joshua was born in Albemarle County, Virginia about 1774 and remained there his entire life.  On August 22, 1797, he married Melinda BRUCE, daughter of Richard BRUCE and Caty WHITE.  They raised at least three confirmed children but perhaps more.  The 1820 census for Fredericksville Parish in Albemarle shows a family that I expect to see:

MALES
1 10-15 – possibly Isaac
1 16-25 – possibly a son-in-law Michael Shiflett
1 45+ – Joshua
FEMALES
2 under 10 – possibly children of Minerva and Michael
2 16-25 – Minerva and Melissa
1 26-44 – Melinda

But in 1830, the family is more difficult to pinpoint:
MALES
2 5-9 – ?  Who are these children?
1 20-29 – Isaac
1 60-69 – Joshua
FEMALES
1 15-19 – ?  Who is this?
1 50-59 – Melinda
1 female slave 36-54


THREE GENERATIONS:
Joshua SHIFLETT ( 1774 Albemarle Co, VA –  About 1838 Albemarle Co, VA ) & Melinda BRUCE (1783 Albemarle Co, VA – Sep 1872 Greene Co, VA )   22 Aug 1797 Albemarle Co, VA

1. Minerva SHIFLETT ( 1798 Albemarle Co, VA – Before 1850 Albemarle Co, VA ) & Michael “Miley” SHIFLETT  (1793 Albemarle Co, VA – After 1850 Albemarle Co, VA ) 10 Feb 1818 Albemarle Co, VA
  • Caroline SHIFLETT ( 1825 Albemarle Co, VA – )
  • George SHIFLETT ( 1828 Albemarle Co, VA – )
  • Hardinia SHIFLETT ( 1831 Albemarle Co, VA – )
  • Franklin SHIFLETT ( 1833 Albemarle Co, VA – )
  • Columbus SHIFLETT (1835 Albemarle Co, VA – )
  • Decatur SHIFLETT ( 1837 Albemarle Co, VA – )
  • Hester A. SHIFLETT ( 21 May 1841 Albemarle Co, VA – 23 Jun 1920 Greene Co, VA & William MCALISTER 30 Jul 1866 Greene Co, VA
  • Henrietta Clay SHIFLETT ( 02 Jan 1845 Albemarle Co, VA – ) & Lucian Quint COLEMAN (1859 – ) 21 Nov 1880 Augusta Co, VA 
2. Melissa SHIFLETT ( 1802 Albemarle Co, VA – After 1870 Harrison, WV ) & Joseph Joel SHIFLETT (1791 Albemarle Co, VA –  19 Apr 1856 West Virginia)  20 Oct 1824 Albemarle Co, VA
  • Joab SHIFLETT ( 1824 – )
  • Maria SHIFLETT ( 1825 – )
  • Joseph SHIFLETT ( 1832 – )
  • Zephania SHIFLETT ( 1834 – )
  • Catherine SHIFLETT ( 1837 – )
  • Anderson / Alfred SHIFLETT ( 1839 – )
  • John SHIFLETT ( 1840 – )
  • Louis SHIFLETT ( 1842 – )
  • Melican SHIFLETT (1844 – ) 
3. Isaac SHIPLETT ( May 1807 Albemarle Co, VA – Jan 1862 Albemarle Co, VA ) & Susan JORDAN  (1814 – 28 Feb 1882 Rockingham Co, VA ) 24 Oct 1836 Albemarle, VA
  • Philip Penelton SHIPLETT ( 29 Oct 1837 Albemarle Co, VA  – 16 Mar 1919 Rockingham Co, VA ) & Jennetta Ann DOVEL (17 Jan 1841 – 24 Mar 1922 Rockingham Co, VA )
  • Octavius SHIPLETT ( 1841 Albemarle Co, VA – 03 Jul 1863 Gettysburg, Adams, PA )
  • Lycennius H. SHIPLETT ( 1844 Albemarle Co, VA  – 16 Mar 1919 Rockingham Co, VA) & Emily J. “Ginny” BRUCE  17 Dec 1867 Albemarle, VA
  • Comaia Clarissa SHIPLETT ( 1847 Albemarle Co, VA – 03 Sep 1894 ) & John Wesley LONG ( 1847 – )  25 Jul 1867 Albemarle, VA
  • Segourney F. SHIFLETT ( 1851 Albemarle Co, VA  – 09 Feb 1926 Washington DC) & George Harvey EPPARD (1839 Albemarle Co, VA – 13 Jan 1917 Rockingham Co, VA )  28 May 1870 Rockingham Co, VA
  • M. E. SHIPLETT ( 1854 Albemarle Co, VA – )
  • George SHIPLETT ( 1856 Albemarle Co, VA – )


© 2014, Wendy Mathias.  All rights reserved.

Friday, November 14, 2014

Sepia Saturday: A Couple o' Couples

Sepia Saturday challenges bloggers to share family history through old photographs.



This week’s Sepia Saturday prompt features a couple crossing a river.  On January 25, 1925, “couples” seemed to be an important theme of the day for my grandaunt Velma Davis (later Woodring when she and Woody became an official couple). 

In 1925, Velma was a student at Harrisonburg Teachers College (now James Madison UniversityGo Dukes!).  Even though it was an all girls school, there were plenty of men sniffing around.  Some lived locally; others came by bus from nearby schools like the University of Virginia and Virginia Military Institute. 

Lucas's House Harrisonburg, VA 25 Jan 1925  http://jollettetc.blogspot.com
Top Left to Right: Unknown,
Thelma Haga, Thelma Hockman,
and Unknown
Bottom:  Velma Davis and Unknown
On that Sunday afternoon in January, several couples posed for pictures at “Lucas’s house.”  I have no idea who Lucas was.  Aware that Lucas is a common surname in the Shenandoah Valley, I searched the 1920 census for Harrisonburg, and sure enough there was a Lucas family who ran a boarding house.  Maybe one or more of the young men who were paired up with Velma and her friends were living there in 1925. 

"Mac and Skeeter" 25 Jan 1925 http://jollettetc.blogspot.com
Mac and Skeeter























Either Mac or Skeeter appears to be proposing to Velma’s longtime friend Thelma Hockman, but Velma’s caption in her photo album suggests they were just joking.  But maybe not.  In 1927, Thelma married Lacy Sarver.  If I were a man named “Lacy,” I’d gladly adopt a nickname like Mac or Skeeter.

Of course, Lucas could be a first name as well, so Lucas COULD be this young man with Thelma Haga, another one of Velma’s college friends.  Velma captioned this photo “Quite contented.”  If this is Lucas, then they were not content for long.  Thelma married a man named Charles Ragland in 1930.

Thelma Haga and friend 25 Jan 1925 http://jollettetc.blogspot.com
Thelma Haga and Friend
captioned:  Quite contented



As for Velma and one-half of “Mac and Skeeter,” they didn’t work out either.  Two years later – almost to the day – she married Arthur “Woody” Woodring. 
 
Velma and Woody Woodring, Violetta Davis Apr 1929  http://jollettetc.blogspot.com
Velma and Woody Woodring, Violetta Davis
in the Shenandoah River April 1929

Hold on tight as you cross the river to Sepia Saturday.


© 2014, Wendy Mathias.  All rights reserved.